Wenche Lyche

I love working with my hands, making textile objects and I have worked with textiles since 1998. My favorite teqnique, these days is going back to basics and create patters the old way.

Q&A

What craft do you work with? 

My main love and focus is surface patters design in textiles. My background is from fashion as a tailor of exclusive wear for women, a company that I started with after my BA degree from Beckman School of Design. I love working with my hands, making textile objects and I have worked with textiles since 1998. My favorite teqnique, these days is going back to basics and create patters the old way. The old way is making my own brushes from bluberry bushes around my cabin, slowly binking, drying and using them for silk painting, by hand. Not controllabe- more free!

What inspires you to work with this craft? 

Customization where each cbject is unique id my main focus. Textiles such as silk, wool and natural fibers are preferred and my interest lyes in challenging the he performance in each textile, the softnes and luster of silk, the bouncing motion of organza and the solidity of wool. I have always prioritized quality in every step because it means do much to me to sew, stitch, print, customize function, using color as a driver for joy! I love using color in my work and I always will.

How does your creative process start?

I always start with the form of a piece. It’s my blank canvas and becomes the vehicle for my decoration. It’s important for the two to work together so the decoration is always in the forefront of my mind when I create each piece. I mainly draw to develop ideas but I also like to work three dimensionally, constructing paper and clay models.

I probably find the most difficult part of my process is to transition from an initial idea through to a piece that will work. Clay takes a lot of understanding and getting it to do what you want it to can be a challenge that takes a lot of trail and error.

Probably the most rewarding stage of producing one of my pots is the decorating. I usually sketch my design onto the piece before scratching, as there’s no going back once you score into the surface. When I start the sgraffito all of my concentration is focussed on the piece. Holding it in my lap, it becomes just me and the pot and while one slip could ruin it, I find that at this point I’m the most relaxed and completely absorbed in my craft.

How would you best describe your workspace and what tools could you not do without?

My workspace is small, compact and full of fabrics, thread, ribbons and pictures of earlier work. I cannot work without a good pair of scissor, sewing needles and thread.

Are there new techniques you would like to try?

Cross over material combinations such as textile and porcelain would be fantastic. Sculpuring fabrics with different qualities and then paint it!

What have you learnt or the best advice that you would like to share with fellow crafters?

Staying in the process for longer without being resultdriven is my best advice to other crafters. Letting discoveries come slowly to you. Being enthusiastic about work needs to be number one to keep up the good work.

What professional dream do you have?

Exhibition my work would be my next step and then in a huge room with high celing with textiles hanging from the roof and down letting each print shine and move slowly.

Media & Contact

Representation

Company: Yellow Wagtail

 

References

Instagram: Lycheli2

Exhibition: norskekunsthandverkere.no

Location

Norway

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